People

Lisa Geraci, Ph.D.

Principal investigator

Lisa Geraci is the director of the Aging and Cognition Laboratory and an Associate Professor of Psychology at Texas A&M University. She has a B.A. from Macalester College in St. Paul, MN and a Ph.D. from Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, NY.

Representative Publications

  • Geraci, L., & Miller, T. M. (2013). Improving older adults’ memory performance using prior task success. Psychology and Aging, 28, 340-345.
  • McCabe, D. P., Geraci, L., Bowman, J. K., Sensenig, A. E., & Rhodes, M. G. (2011). On the validity of remember‑know judgments: Evidence from think aloud protocols. Consciousness and Cognition, 20, 1625-1633.
  • Geraci, L. & Manzano, I. (2010). Distinctive items are salient at encoding: Delayed judgments of learning predict the isolation effect.  Quarterly Journal Experimental Psychology, 63, 50-64.
  • Geraci, L. & Barnhardt, T. M. (2010). Aging and implicit memory: Examining the contribution of test awareness. Consciousness and Cognition, 19, 606-616.
  • Geraci, L., McCabe, D. P., & Guillory, J. J. (2009). On interpreting the relationship between remember-know judgments and confidence: The role of instructions. Consciousness & Cognition, 18, 701-709.
  • Geraci, L. (2006). A test of the frontal lobe hypothesis of age effects in production priming. Neuropsychology, 20, 530-548.

Ross De Forrest, B.S.

Graduate Student

Ross De Forrest is a 7th generation Texan and earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Texas at San Antonio in Psychology with a minor in mathematics. Ross is currently a fourth-year graduate student. His research focuses on how memory changes across the lifespan and how personality features influence memory performance.

Representative Publications

  •  Geraci, L., Hughes, M. L., Miller, T. M., & De Forrest. (in press). The effect of prior task success on older adults memory performance: Examining the influence of different types of task success. Experimental Aging Research.
  • Hughes, M. L., Geraci, L., & De Forrest, R. L. (2013). Aging 5 years in 5 minutes: The effect of taking a memory test on older adults’ subjective age. Psychological Science, 24, 2481-2488.

Gabriel Saenz, B.A.

Graduate StudentSaenz photo2

Gabriel Saenz earned his undergraduate degree in Psychology from Texas A&M University in 2014. Gabriel is currently a second-year graduate student. His research focuses on improving students’ metacognition and performance in the classroom. He is also interested in age-related memory changes.

Robert Tirso, B.S.

Graduate StudentTirso3

Robert Tirso earned his undergraduate degree in Psychology from Texas A&M University in 2014. Robert is a first-year graduate student. His research focuses on self-perceptions of aging and on the measurement of Alzheimer’s disease.

Lab Alumni 

Matthew Hughes, Ph.D.

Matthew Hughes earned his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in 2014. Dr. Hughes is now a post-doctoral fellow in the Lifespan Developmental Psychology Laboratory at Brandeis University. His research focuses on methods for improving older adults’ memory self efficacy and memory performance.

Representative Publications

  • Hughes, M. L., Geraci, L.,& De Forrest, R. L. (2013). Aging 5 years in 5 minutes: The effect of taking a memory test on older adults’ subjective age. Psychological Science, 24, 2481-2488.
  • Geraci, L., McDaniel, M. A., Miller, T. M., & Hughes, M. L. (2013). The bizarreness effect: Evidence for the critical influence of retrieval processes. Memory & Cognition, 41, 1228-1137.

Tyler Miller, Ph.D.

Tyler Miller received his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in 2012 and is an Assistant Professor in his home state of South Dakota at South Dakota State University. His research interests include memory, metacognition, cognitive aging, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Representative Publications

  • Miller, T. M. & Geraci, L. (2014). Improving metacognitive accuracy: How failing to retrieve practice items reduces overconfidence. Consciousness and Cognition, 29, 131-140.
  • Geraci, L., & Miller, T. M. (2013). Improving older adults’ memory performance using prior task success. Psychology and Aging, 28, 340-345.
  • Miller, T. M. & Geraci L. (2011). Training metacognition in the classroom: How incentives and feedback influence exam predictions. Metacognition and Learning, 6, 303-314.
  • Miller, T. M. & Geraci L. (2011). Unskilled but aware: Reinterpreting overconfidence in low performing students. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 37, 502-506.
  • Balsis, S., Miller, T. M., Benge, J., Doody, R (2011). Dementia staging across three different methods. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 31, 328-333.
  • Miller, T. M., Balsis, S., Benge J. F., Lowe, D., & Doody, R. S. (2011). Item Response Theory Reveals Variability of Functional Impairment within Clinical Dementia Rating Scale Stages. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 32, 362-366

Jimmeka Guillory, Ph.D.

JimmekaGuillory[1]Jimmeka Guillory earned her B.A. (2006) and Ph.D. (2011) in Psychology from Texas A&M University. Her research focuses on correcting erroneous inferences in memory. Dr. Guillory is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Spelman College in Atlanta, GA.

Representative Publications

  • Guillory, J. J. & Geraci, L. (in press). The continued influence effect: Examining the effect of valence on the acceptance of corrected information. Applied Cognitive Psychology.
  • Geraci, L., Hamilton, M., & Guillory, J. J. (in press). Age effects in implicit memory: The role of response competition induced by relative word frequency. Experimental Aging Research.
  • Guillory, J. J., & Geraci, L.(2013). Correcting erroneous inferences in memory: The role of source credibility. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 2, 201-209.
  • Guillory, J.J. & Geraci, L. (2010). Remembering facts and believing inferences: Younger and older adults’ continued use of false inferences. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 17, 73-81.
  • Geraci, L., McCabe, D. P., & Guillory, J. J. (2009). On interpreting the relationship between remember-know judgments and confidence: The role of instructions. Consciousness & Cognition, 18, 701-709.